How Are You Addressing Your Root?

“‘Sir,’ the man replied, ‘leave it alone for one more year, and I’ll dig around it and fertilize it. – Luke 13:8 All of us tend to classify people into categories. Good or bad. Saved or lost. Successful or lazy. Jesus was talking to a group of people that had assumed they were better, or more righteous, because something bad had not happened to them. In reply, Jesus confronted this belief by asking if the people who had died suddenly were more guilty or bigger sinners than others living in the same place. Then Jesus went on with a parable about a tree that was not producing any fruit. When the man who owned the vineyard asked that the tree be cut down, the caretaker made the reply that is quoted above. “I’ll dig around it and fertilize it.” Notice what the first impulse was – to address the root of the tree. In response to the lack of fruit, the caretaker did not look to the branches and leaves. The same principle can be repeated for unhealthy fruit. A problem with the fruit is the result of a problem with the root. Repentance requires that we address our root. Becoming more aware that we realize the depth to which we look to the world for significance. Authentic fruit is the result of being rooted in Christ. Having an identity that is defined by God’s love for you is an intentional process of knowing your lies and when you are prone to shame and applying truth. What areas are you tempted to root your identity apart from God? In...

Are you keeping people out?

In relationships, all of us have a part of our self that we attempt to protect. For some, the process of growing in relationship means addressing those walls and removing them. Choosing to trust and allow vulnerability. On the other hand, for others a wall seems a necessity and they work to build it up as fast as possible. A wall gives the feeling of protecting identity. If someone cannot see the real you, then they cannot reject you. A wall gives the sense of control. By controlling people’s behavior and what is acceptable in relationship, you feel like the one in charge. A wall gives the illusion of effort. Because you are working hard to maintain your wall, it feels like working on the relationship. A wall gives an excuse. When another person gets tired of trying to break through your wall, you can then blame them for the failure of the relationship. Problem is, not only do walls protect from what’s outside, they trap you on the inside. They steal your freedom. Those you present your wall to are not responding to you, but to your facade. That does not change the feeling of rejection. It is lonely within your borders because your true self will not feel loved. How are you keeping people out? Is it a compulsion? An issue of performance? Fault finding? Something else entirely? Taking down a wall required developing awareness of identity and the lies you are believing. Some of the bricks will be easy and some painful. Because of the lies, your wall is built upon sand, that is why it...

Gain Perspective. Live Well.

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