Identity and Leadership Workshop October 16

There are a limited number of seats available to this Orlando area workshop. Introduction to Identity and the Christian Leader October 16, 2014, 11:30 – 1:00 pm, Orlando, FL The Church of the Ascension (click for map) Cost: $20 per person, includes lunch This workshop will introduce the idea of identity and how it forms the lens for our decisions, behaviors, and values. Some of the many leadership dangers of a misplaced identity include burnout, marriage issues, lack of team motivation, feeling isolated, continually running out of time, results-based insecurity and distrust. Understanding how and why you generate your own sense of worth versus developing your identity in Christ is the first step to leading from your strengths, aligning mission and motivation, and improving your team’s and then your organization’s relational system. Click here for workshop description, more details, and to...

The Need for Rest

Here is an article from the New York Times about the affects on the brain of constant and unstructured stimulus. It serves as a reminder to the Christian leader, as well as all disciples, of the physical need for sabbath and a pragmatic purpose behind God’s requirement that we observe one. Check out the article here and let me know what you think. How motivated are you to unplug and schedule rest? How do you view the work ethic of someone who regularly rests? Describe the importance you feel there is between unplugging and rest. What steps can you take to more regularly experience rest? A coach is a great resource to help you organize your time and goals. I am a certified coach specializing in pastoral leadership, relationships, life transitions, and identity. Services I offer are one-on-one coaching, group/staff coaching,  speaking at organizations/churches, leadership workshops, and church retreats. For more info, click here to contact...

Gaining Influence

As a leader in several volunteer organizations, I have much experience in recruiting volunteers, empowering teams, creating internal and external partnerships, and developing a sense of ownership. Because of this background, I was asked as a leadership coach give a short staff development workshop at a local counseling center. Within their context, the need is to build a client base. In order to achieve this, the staff needed instruction on how to develop advocates and build partnerships. Advocates who will speak from their experience create an organic word of mouth in the community each counselor is attempting to influence. For the staff of this counseling office, the difficulty was compounded by the fact that people are reluctant to talk about their counseling experience. For the client, seeing a counselor often comes with a sense of shame or weakness. Beyond the individual level, the staff was looking to build partnerships with other organizations where they could provide their services. How does one gain influence? Speaking broadly, there are two main approaches to making big asks of people’s time and/or behavior. 1. Tell people WHAT you want done. This is the most common approach. All of us do this with some degree of frequency. Most people employ this method exclusively. The WHAT  is easy to verbalize because it is in the forefront of our mind. The WHAT takes less energy to communicate. The WHAT sometimes gives us the result we want, namely compliance. Yet, it is rarely the most effective method for being influential. It is asking for hack clash royale obedience and the response will be for the doer to simply get the job...

A Partner for Change

When beginning a coaching relationship with someone, the first question I ask is “do you have the will to change the system?”. This question can be in reference to any facet of change, including: leadership culture church systems relational systems personal development spiritual development Desire to change is one thing, having the will to change is entirely another. (click here to tweet that) Change is difficult. Changing successfully and maintaining involves developing new habits, responses, and ways of thinking and observing. This will feel unnatural at first and needs to be approached intentionally and mindfully. Change is often slow. Or at least the pace of change is not linear. The results that are desired in any of the above arenas will not be instantaneous and will be filled with set-backs and learning moments. It takes time, often many months before the system will accept and embrace change. The important thing is to intentionally take one step at a time. Change is met with resistance. It may be personal resistance as the change feels new and uncomfortable. We will long for results and be tempted to turn back. Or the resistance may be from the system that is being change. Others involved will take time to learn and respond to the new patterns. Change is painful. If it wasn’t, we would not be frustrated with it. Desiring some change is itself a response to pain, discomfort or dysfunction. Often though, we second guess because of the pain involved and this can erode our diligence. The good news is that the pain is only temporary. Change is necessary for health. Human beings are not static creatures, nor are...

Gain Perspective. Live Well.

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